Breaking the Rules is Now Available!

The main characters in Breaking the Rules are Miss Lilly Lowell and Mr. Roger Morris. I introduced both of them in The Earl’s Inconvenient Wife, which I published way back in 2012. Over the years, I’ve had a couple of requests to write their story. I didn’t have the right plot to put them in until recently, so that’s why it took me so long to get to it.

You may want to read The Earl’s Inconvenient Wife first.

If you haven’t read The Earl’s Inconvenient Wife, it’s free at all retailers so you can pick it up and read it first. (Links to the book are on this page.) The Earl’s Inconvenient Wife is Book 1 in the Marriage by Scandal Series.

I did recently change the cover. In case you don’t recognize the new cover, I thought I should post the old one. If you only found me after I changed covers, I’ll post the new one, too.

The old cover looked like this:

the earl's inconvenient wife new ebook cover3

The new cover looks like this:

20200108_TheEarlsInconvenientWife

Is it necessary to read The Earl’s Inconvenient Wife? No. But if you want the backstory that goes with Lilly and Roger, you’ll want to. I don’t go heavily into their backstory in Breaking the Rules.

Another note I want to make about Breaking the Rules is that this book takes place BEFORE A Most Unsuitable Earl. That means that Ethan (Lord Edon) and Christopher (Mr. Robinson) are still SINGLE at the time of this book. This is very important to remember when reading Breaking the Rules. If I explain why, it’ll spoil some of the book.

With all that aside, I’ll finally get to the information about Breaking the Rules.

Breaking The Rules new ebook cover2

Here’s the description:

They say a proper lady follows the rules. She lets the gentleman take the lead. She obeys her chaperone. She is soft spoken and careful in everything she says and does. She doesn’t intrude into a gentleman’s business. And she most certainly doesn’t become the object of scandal.

Miss Lilly Lowell has been careful to follow the rules all of her life. But the rules aren’t helping her now when she needs it most. She made the terrible mistake of spurning Mr. Morris’ attention, and now he’s looking for someone else to marry. Determined to get him back, she hatches a plan to make him fall in love with her again. And doing so will require her to start breaking some rules.

Hurt by Miss Lowell’s rejection, Mr. Roger Morris is seeking out another lady to court. But after endless social engagements, it starts to become clear to him that no one can take her place. Whether he likes it or not, he is doomed to love her. She is the perfect lady for him. But the last thing he wants to do is give in, especially when she creates a scandal that forces him to marry her.

This might just be a match made in hell. Or maybe, quite possibly, heaven…as long as Lilly can figure out a way to make things right.

Here is where you can find it:

Amazon US

Amazon UK

Barnes & Noble

Kobo

Apple

Google Play

Smashwords

Payhip

I did upload it to Google Play, but at this time, it’s not live in the store.

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To Those Who Read The Stagecoach Bride

To the below, I sent out The Outlaw Bride to you on January 24. I got an email from two of you now who are claiming you never received this. I tried sending these files out again this morning, and they all ended up in a “donotreply” sender. I don’t know what is going on with the email program, but I’m unable to send the file. In the future, I’ll use my other email address.

I am so frustrated right now. Words just can’t even begin to explain. I also have kiddos buzzing around me because we’re supposed to go out to the store to pick up groceries. After that, the whole day is going to be hectic around here. I don’t have time to try to dig through all the emails and manually put everything in.

Okay, this is what I’m going to do. I’m going to make The Outlaw’s Bride book free on Smashwords. It might take a day or two, but it’ll be free on B&N, Kobo, and Apple as well because Smashwords will update the price for me. I’ll set the book to $0.99 on Amazon. Amazon takes about a week or two to price match free. (Amazon won’t let me manually make the book free, but they will price match.)

I’m really sorry. I did send these files out on January 24, but apparently, no one got them, and I don’t know whether to cry or throw something, so I’m just going to make this blog post and give the link to the book page in this post so you can you can find the links to your retailer. Like I said, give it a while to go free on Amazon. But Smashwords will be right away. Apple should update within a few hours. I’m not sure how long B&N or Kobo will take, but I assume a day or two. I also set it free on Google Play. That should be going through any time now.

Here’s the page to The Outlaw’s Bride: https://ruthannnordinauthorblog.com/chronological-order-of-my-books/my-historical-westerns/wyoming-series/the-outlaws-bride-wyoming-series-book-1/

Again, I’m sorry. I thought those emails got sent out.

 

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Loving Eliza Trivia

Thanks to those who mentioned an interest in learning more about Loving Eliza! I have down other books I’ll do trivia on in the future. Here’s the order: Bid for a Bride, Bride of Second Chances, A Bride for Tom, The Accidental Mail Order Bride, The Earl’s Wallflower Bride, The Marriage Contract, and Boaz’s Wager. I’ll work on more after those are done.

For now, let’s get to Loving Eliza!

loving eliza new ebook cover 3

  • This is the book I wrote that launched my very first spin-off series from the Nebraska Series. Eliza was introduced in His Redeeming Bride as the prostitute Neil Craftsman often went to in the past. In the scene at the bar when she told Neil she only played along with the other men in tricking him because she had a son and that she didn’t want him to find out about her, I became interested in her character and wanted to learn more about her and her past. To do that, I had to give her a better future. That was how Loving Eliza was born.
  • I didn’t originally plan to make Loving Eliza the first book in a new series. It was supposed to be a standalone romance. One of my beta readers at the time, however, mentioned wanting to see Eliza have a child. I didn’t want to give John and Eliza a biological child because I personally knew a couple of people who weren’t able to have children, and I wanted to show that not every couple is able to have them. So what I opted to do was give John and Eliza a child to adopt. That was how Loving Eliza became the first book in the South Dakota Series.
  • I named the hero after my deaf son, John. I wanted to give the hero a disability, but I didn’t want to make him deaf like my son. I opted to make him mute. That way he could hear what Eliza, who was a chatterbox, was saying while also giving him trouble communicating so that people assumed he was mentally handicapped. The reason the people thought John was mentally handicapped was because a lot of people I came in contact with thought that about my son (including one of his teachers). This was a source of frustration for me at the time. Now I just tell people right away my son is deaf. It’s amazing how many people jump to conclusions about someone who can’t hear. (I’m sure parents of children with other disabilities get frustrated by the reactions of others, too.)
  • Another reason I made John mute was so that I could put myself into the shoes of a character who wanted to communicate with the world but had difficulty doing so. This was my attempt to gain better insight into what my son went through on a daily basis. The strategy worked. After that, the communication he and I shared improved significantly. While a writer might not know exactly what it’s like to be someone who is different from them, writing in that character’s point of view goes a long way to understanding that person a lot better. This is why I’m in full support of writers going outside their comfort zones and writing a character who is different from them. It opens the door of compassion when you put yourself into someone else’s position and imagine how the world is from their perspective.
  • Eliza, by far, was the easiest character I ever wrote. Every scene pretty much wrote itself. I got an appreciation for going deeply into a character’s point of view from this book, and ever since then, I have embraced this technique in all of my work.
  • Piggybacking off of the last point… When I write in a character’s point of view, I go through everything they do. It doesn’t matter what the scene is about or what the character is going through. So when Eliza was hungry, I was also hungry. Those scenes where she was struggling with hunger pangs were equally uncomfortable for me. I got to the point where I couldn’t take it anymore and ate a full course meal before writing any more scenes where she was hungry, but while writing them, I would feel hungry anyway. I knew I wasn’t hungry, but my stomach would growl and pester me to eat. So when I finished the scenes, I would grab something to eat, and my stomach was finally satisfied. It’s amazing how the human brain can influence our body. Needless to say, Eliza and I were both relieved when she was no longer facing each scene hungry. 😀
  • Before I wrote this book, I didn’t care for the color yellow. I didn’t hate it, but I didn’t love it, either. I picked this color for Eliza because I wanted to create a deeper meaning to the color yellow. (I do this from time to time in order to give the story a more personal touch.) The sun is the color yellow. Also, the word “sun” has the same sound as the word “son”. To me, Jesus Christ, the “Son” of God, has always been my main source of hope. I wanted Eliza to latch onto that same concept as she came to accept everything that had happened to her. I didn’t always want her to look up at the sky, so I decided to have yellow flowers. Those flowers were really reflective of Jesus Christ. Ever since that book, I have loved the color yellow.
  • I, personally, hate Romeo and Juliet. I’m not a fan of books with sad endings. I love The Scarlet Letter because of its message that good can come out of a bad situation. (Plus, it had a really good twist halfway into it.) This is why Eliza hated Romeo and Juliet and loved The Scarlet Letter. I don’t always impose my personal preferences onto a character like that, but in Eliza’s case, both of those fit for her personality, so it made sense to do it.
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